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lizardking90:

U.S. Pacific Blue Whales Seen Rebounding Close To Historic Levels

Decades after the threat of extinction led to them being protected from whalers, there are now about 2,200 blue whales off the West Coast, according to a new study. That’s roughly 97 percent of historical levels, say researchers at the University of Washington who call their findings a conservation success story.

"This is the only population of blue whales known to have recovered from whaling," according to a university news release, “blue whales as a species having been hunted nearly to extinction.”

The scientists say the population of California blue whales was never as large as many of those elsewhere on Earth, citing research that shows that whales in the eastern Pacific Ocean are distinct from those in the western Pacific. California blue whales swim in waters from the equator up to Alaska.

The new report is coming out months after the same research team studied the damage done to the same blue whale population from 1905-1971. They say the gains off the U.S. coast show that blue whales, the huge animals that have often been used to promote wildlife and environmental protections, can rebound elsewhere, as well.

The recovery of California blue whales from whaling demonstrates the ability of blue whale populations to rebuild under careful management and conservation measures,” said study lead author Cole Monnahan, a doctoral student in quantitative ecology and resource management.

The researchers believe that a rebound close to historic levels might explain the whales’ recently slowing population growth better than theories that blame deadly strikes by large ships. They suggest that the animals’ large size — they can reach nearly 100 feet in length, and can weigh nearly 200 tons — might limit their population density.

From the study in the journal Marine Mammal Science:

"Our analysis suggests that while current levels of ship strikes are likely above legal limits, they do not immediately threaten the status of the ENP blue whale. This conclusion is based on the log-linear model which suggested the population has likely increased since 1993 (despite ship strikes), and from the theta-logistic model, which found this growth has slowed due to density dependence, not ship strikes."

But even if the study’s new data are confirmed by further research, “there is still going to be ongoing concern that we don’t want these whales killed by ships,” says study co-author Trevor Branch, assistant professor of aquatic and fishery sciences.

The University of Washington study was funded in part by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, through the Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean.

-NPR  

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geeksotospeak-inactive:

99 percent of the times i see a cat, i have to drop whatever the hell i’m doing and acknowledge that there’s a cat and say hi to the cat and walk up to the cat and try to pet the cat

Posted 5 days ago

sixpenceee:

sixpenceee:

Qian Hongyan was just four when she lost both her legs. A speeding trucker left her for dead as she crossed the main road in her village of Zhuangshang in southern China. 

For nearly two years Qian was immobile as she didn’t even have enough of her body left to sit up in a wheelchair. Doctors said her only hope of being able to move by herself again would be extensive surgery to allow her to be fitted with prosthetic limbs.Her parents couldn’t afford this treatment. 

Qian’s granddad Yuan came up with a simple but effective treatment to get her moving again. He took a basketball the village boys had discarded and cut a hole just big enough for tiny Qian to fit into, padded the inside with stiff floor mats from his car, then propped her up inside. All of a sudden Qian was able to stabilize herself and was able to by move herself by rolling the ball in any direction she wanted. She supported herself using wooden handles. 

From that day on Qian would not be stopped by any obstacle. She went back to school, started to play with her friends again, and started to get back the life of any girl her age. She began professional swimming training in 2007 and defied the odds of her double amputation to become one of the first members of the Yunnan Youth Swimming Club.

She won three gold medals in last year’s Yunnan Para Games and took a gold and two silver medals at the National Swimming Championship for the Disabled (Under 18) in 2009 before continuing impressively at this year’s Para Games.

SOURCE

I should have added this in the original post but after attention in the Chinese press, Qian traveled to Beijing to receive free artificial limbs at the China Rehabilitation Research Center, a center that has been providing help to the disabled in China for over 20 years. At 18 years old she is ready for her full adult prosthetics. 

Posted 5 days ago

thosecomics:

Summary of my allergy

Posted 5 days ago